Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Fun Facts From My Foster Care Manual

I still haven't found anything about hair cuts for foster kids in my manual. 

I did however come across some other interesting rules I didn't know about.

1. All clothing purchased for a foster child must go with them when they leave your home, this includes clothing they have outgrown.

2. Medical assistance health insurance for foster children doesn't reimburse doctors as well as private insurance. To help make this up to your foster child's doctor please take your biological children this doctor too.


6 comments:

  1. Okay, so the biological children should not only share their home, toys, and parents attention, but also switch doctors even if they've been going to the same one their whole life. Now that makes so much more sense than the state properly funding doctors in the first place. LOL.

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    1. True Dat!

      Where I'm from you have to go a long way to find a Dr. who takes medical assistance, so I would never switch my kids to a doctor 45 min. away when I can drive them 10 min. to the doctor.

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  2. Our manual has something along the lines of #1. I don't do that one though! I sell or donate the clothes - to other foster parents when possible. I think we are technically supposed to send everything. ie: high chairs, car seats, etc. Personally, I think that's ridiculous. I could NOT afford to buy all those big ticket items

    #2?! Wow!! I ended up switching my kids to the same doctor, but only because I like the doctor. I'd NEVER do it simply because of insurance!!!

    I don't know about the hair cut thing. All I know is that it was an official rule in both Iowa and Texas per the State Minimum Standards.

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    1. It would be pretty ridiculous for me to send Primo home with size 0-3 months sized clothing. He's probably not leaving so I'm passing his old clothes on to his baby sibling.

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  3. I don't have a manual. Well, they gave me one when we started fostering, but told me it was already out of date, so I never use it.

    On #1, it was explained to me this way. If you get reimbursed for it, it belongs to the child. So, if I buy a car seat or whatever and don't get reimbursed, it stays here. I think most of us have bought some of the clothing out of our own budgets, and it's just silly to divide it up ... "this goes, this stays." The things that are hand-me-downs from by bio kids, I usually keep (unless they currently fit and have become a "favorite".) For the rest of the too small things, I do it on a case-by-case. 8 year old girl: went through the "too small" clothes with me to decide what she wanted to "donate" and what she wanted to keep. 4 year old boy with a baby brother: it all went home with him -- mom could use the hand-me-downs. 3 year old girl: well, it all went home with her, too, because the stuff that was too small was the first round of clothing that came from home which all had her name written in it with sharpie....

    On #2, I'm with CherubMamms. I did switch my kids, but I did it because I liked the dr and it would be more convenient to have one pediatrician for everybody. (The pediatrician they had been using didn't take Medicaid.)

    The hair cut thing was, for me, a part of a rules that says we "cannot make changes to the child's appearance without parental permission." So, no piercing ears/noses/belly buttons/etc, no dying hair and no haircuts. Personally, I think the haircut is kind of an extreme interpretation. If a little boy comes to me with short hair, isn't it less of "making a change to his appearance" for me to maintain that hairstyle than to let it grow out? But, in that case, I've usually just gotten kind of a standing OK from the parent to do that and not had to ask every time he needed a trim.

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    1. Great idea to get a standing OK from parents to maintain a certain length of hair, that's what we did this summer, so much easier.

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